Studio visit with Carmen Osterlye on October 3, 2013

I was first introduced to Carmen Osterlye’s work by her stunning installation at the Wassaic Project this summer, called Den of Blossomy. All of these photographs are of that installation except for the first, which was a recent shot in her studio. Carmen is a recent LA transplant who was making video projections for night clubs, and then found herself wanting to push the bounds of projection mapping beyond the comfort level of her clients. In Den of Blossomy, the piece in Wassaic, you watch flowers bloom and die in seconds, projection mapped onto furniture and empty picture frames. Osterlye grew and filmed each flower herself, giving new meaning to the notion of artistic creation. Some things she wants to try in the future: creating a hunting lodge and making clothing patterns come to life. Studio visit with Carmen Osterlye on October 3, 2013

I was first introduced to Carmen Osterlye’s work by her stunning installation at the Wassaic Project this summer, called Den of Blossomy. All of these photographs are of that installation except for the first, which was a recent shot in her studio. Carmen is a recent LA transplant who was making video projections for night clubs, and then found herself wanting to push the bounds of projection mapping beyond the comfort level of her clients. In Den of Blossomy, the piece in Wassaic, you watch flowers bloom and die in seconds, projection mapped onto furniture and empty picture frames. Osterlye grew and filmed each flower herself, giving new meaning to the notion of artistic creation. Some things she wants to try in the future: creating a hunting lodge and making clothing patterns come to life. Studio visit with Carmen Osterlye on October 3, 2013

I was first introduced to Carmen Osterlye’s work by her stunning installation at the Wassaic Project this summer, called Den of Blossomy. All of these photographs are of that installation except for the first, which was a recent shot in her studio. Carmen is a recent LA transplant who was making video projections for night clubs, and then found herself wanting to push the bounds of projection mapping beyond the comfort level of her clients. In Den of Blossomy, the piece in Wassaic, you watch flowers bloom and die in seconds, projection mapped onto furniture and empty picture frames. Osterlye grew and filmed each flower herself, giving new meaning to the notion of artistic creation. Some things she wants to try in the future: creating a hunting lodge and making clothing patterns come to life. Studio visit with Carmen Osterlye on October 3, 2013

I was first introduced to Carmen Osterlye’s work by her stunning installation at the Wassaic Project this summer, called Den of Blossomy. All of these photographs are of that installation except for the first, which was a recent shot in her studio. Carmen is a recent LA transplant who was making video projections for night clubs, and then found herself wanting to push the bounds of projection mapping beyond the comfort level of her clients. In Den of Blossomy, the piece in Wassaic, you watch flowers bloom and die in seconds, projection mapped onto furniture and empty picture frames. Osterlye grew and filmed each flower herself, giving new meaning to the notion of artistic creation. Some things she wants to try in the future: creating a hunting lodge and making clothing patterns come to life.

Studio visit with Carmen Osterlye on October 3, 2013

I was first introduced to Carmen Osterlye’s work by her stunning installation at the Wassaic Project this summer, called Den of Blossomy. All of these photographs are of that installation except for the first, which was a recent shot in her studio. Carmen is a recent LA transplant who was making video projections for night clubs, and then found herself wanting to push the bounds of projection mapping beyond the comfort level of her clients. In Den of Blossomy, the piece in Wassaic, you watch flowers bloom and die in seconds, projection mapped onto furniture and empty picture frames. Osterlye grew and filmed each flower herself, giving new meaning to the notion of artistic creation. Some things she wants to try in the future: creating a hunting lodge and making clothing patterns come to life.

Studio visit with Halsey Hathaway on Tuesday, September 17, 2012

I visited Halsey Hathaway, whose paintings I have long admired, to see some of his recent works on paper and make selections for a small show in the project gallery in December. The drawings are very carefully systematically planned, and there is a drawing for many different iterations of form and color within each system. The current works are twice as high as wide and well you can see what the forms and colors are like. We are going to show three 40 x 20 inch pieces and two 24 x 12 inch pieces. 

Halsey’s recent exhibitions include a solo at Rawson Projects and “Same Same But Different” at The Reinstitute in Baltimore. His wife is another great artist Jolynn Krystosek. Studio visit with Halsey Hathaway on Tuesday, September 17, 2012

I visited Halsey Hathaway, whose paintings I have long admired, to see some of his recent works on paper and make selections for a small show in the project gallery in December. The drawings are very carefully systematically planned, and there is a drawing for many different iterations of form and color within each system. The current works are twice as high as wide and well you can see what the forms and colors are like. We are going to show three 40 x 20 inch pieces and two 24 x 12 inch pieces. 

Halsey’s recent exhibitions include a solo at Rawson Projects and “Same Same But Different” at The Reinstitute in Baltimore. His wife is another great artist Jolynn Krystosek. Studio visit with Halsey Hathaway on Tuesday, September 17, 2012

I visited Halsey Hathaway, whose paintings I have long admired, to see some of his recent works on paper and make selections for a small show in the project gallery in December. The drawings are very carefully systematically planned, and there is a drawing for many different iterations of form and color within each system. The current works are twice as high as wide and well you can see what the forms and colors are like. We are going to show three 40 x 20 inch pieces and two 24 x 12 inch pieces. 

Halsey’s recent exhibitions include a solo at Rawson Projects and “Same Same But Different” at The Reinstitute in Baltimore. His wife is another great artist Jolynn Krystosek. Studio visit with Halsey Hathaway on Tuesday, September 17, 2012

I visited Halsey Hathaway, whose paintings I have long admired, to see some of his recent works on paper and make selections for a small show in the project gallery in December. The drawings are very carefully systematically planned, and there is a drawing for many different iterations of form and color within each system. The current works are twice as high as wide and well you can see what the forms and colors are like. We are going to show three 40 x 20 inch pieces and two 24 x 12 inch pieces. 

Halsey’s recent exhibitions include a solo at Rawson Projects and “Same Same But Different” at The Reinstitute in Baltimore. His wife is another great artist Jolynn Krystosek. Studio visit with Halsey Hathaway on Tuesday, September 17, 2012

I visited Halsey Hathaway, whose paintings I have long admired, to see some of his recent works on paper and make selections for a small show in the project gallery in December. The drawings are very carefully systematically planned, and there is a drawing for many different iterations of form and color within each system. The current works are twice as high as wide and well you can see what the forms and colors are like. We are going to show three 40 x 20 inch pieces and two 24 x 12 inch pieces. 

Halsey’s recent exhibitions include a solo at Rawson Projects and “Same Same But Different” at The Reinstitute in Baltimore. His wife is another great artist Jolynn Krystosek.

Studio visit with Halsey Hathaway on Tuesday, September 17, 2012

I visited Halsey Hathaway, whose paintings I have long admired, to see some of his recent works on paper and make selections for a small show in the project gallery in December. The drawings are very carefully systematically planned, and there is a drawing for many different iterations of form and color within each system. The current works are twice as high as wide and well you can see what the forms and colors are like. We are going to show three 40 x 20 inch pieces and two 24 x 12 inch pieces.

Halsey’s recent exhibitions include a solo at Rawson Projects and “Same Same But Different” at The Reinstitute in Baltimore. His wife is another great artist Jolynn Krystosek.

Studio visits with Russell Tyler and Trudy Benson on Thursday, August 8, 2013

I visited the dynamic husband and wife to select work for an upcoming exhibition at Denny Gallery called “Windows.” Opening on October 24, the exhibition will include work by Trudy Benson, Jeremy Couillard, Mariah Dekkenga, Michael Dotson, Christopher Learey, Jason Stopa and Russell Tyler. 

Russell is currently exhibiting in Acid Summer at DCKT and has a solo show coming up at B15 in Copenhagen. Trudy had a recent blockbuster solo show at Horton Gallery. In a review of her show in the New York Times, Karen Rosenberg noted that “A generation of artists who grew up using a mouse as comfortably as a paintbrush is now coming of age and bringing the giddiness of those formative computer art experiments to good old oil on canvas.” … A perfect conceptual introduction to the Windows exhibition. Studio visits with Russell Tyler and Trudy Benson on Thursday, August 8, 2013

I visited the dynamic husband and wife to select work for an upcoming exhibition at Denny Gallery called “Windows.” Opening on October 24, the exhibition will include work by Trudy Benson, Jeremy Couillard, Mariah Dekkenga, Michael Dotson, Christopher Learey, Jason Stopa and Russell Tyler. 

Russell is currently exhibiting in Acid Summer at DCKT and has a solo show coming up at B15 in Copenhagen. Trudy had a recent blockbuster solo show at Horton Gallery. In a review of her show in the New York Times, Karen Rosenberg noted that “A generation of artists who grew up using a mouse as comfortably as a paintbrush is now coming of age and bringing the giddiness of those formative computer art experiments to good old oil on canvas.” … A perfect conceptual introduction to the Windows exhibition. Studio visits with Russell Tyler and Trudy Benson on Thursday, August 8, 2013

I visited the dynamic husband and wife to select work for an upcoming exhibition at Denny Gallery called “Windows.” Opening on October 24, the exhibition will include work by Trudy Benson, Jeremy Couillard, Mariah Dekkenga, Michael Dotson, Christopher Learey, Jason Stopa and Russell Tyler. 

Russell is currently exhibiting in Acid Summer at DCKT and has a solo show coming up at B15 in Copenhagen. Trudy had a recent blockbuster solo show at Horton Gallery. In a review of her show in the New York Times, Karen Rosenberg noted that “A generation of artists who grew up using a mouse as comfortably as a paintbrush is now coming of age and bringing the giddiness of those formative computer art experiments to good old oil on canvas.” … A perfect conceptual introduction to the Windows exhibition. Studio visits with Russell Tyler and Trudy Benson on Thursday, August 8, 2013

I visited the dynamic husband and wife to select work for an upcoming exhibition at Denny Gallery called “Windows.” Opening on October 24, the exhibition will include work by Trudy Benson, Jeremy Couillard, Mariah Dekkenga, Michael Dotson, Christopher Learey, Jason Stopa and Russell Tyler. 

Russell is currently exhibiting in Acid Summer at DCKT and has a solo show coming up at B15 in Copenhagen. Trudy had a recent blockbuster solo show at Horton Gallery. In a review of her show in the New York Times, Karen Rosenberg noted that “A generation of artists who grew up using a mouse as comfortably as a paintbrush is now coming of age and bringing the giddiness of those formative computer art experiments to good old oil on canvas.” … A perfect conceptual introduction to the Windows exhibition. Studio visits with Russell Tyler and Trudy Benson on Thursday, August 8, 2013

I visited the dynamic husband and wife to select work for an upcoming exhibition at Denny Gallery called “Windows.” Opening on October 24, the exhibition will include work by Trudy Benson, Jeremy Couillard, Mariah Dekkenga, Michael Dotson, Christopher Learey, Jason Stopa and Russell Tyler. 

Russell is currently exhibiting in Acid Summer at DCKT and has a solo show coming up at B15 in Copenhagen. Trudy had a recent blockbuster solo show at Horton Gallery. In a review of her show in the New York Times, Karen Rosenberg noted that “A generation of artists who grew up using a mouse as comfortably as a paintbrush is now coming of age and bringing the giddiness of those formative computer art experiments to good old oil on canvas.” … A perfect conceptual introduction to the Windows exhibition. Studio visits with Russell Tyler and Trudy Benson on Thursday, August 8, 2013

I visited the dynamic husband and wife to select work for an upcoming exhibition at Denny Gallery called “Windows.” Opening on October 24, the exhibition will include work by Trudy Benson, Jeremy Couillard, Mariah Dekkenga, Michael Dotson, Christopher Learey, Jason Stopa and Russell Tyler. 

Russell is currently exhibiting in Acid Summer at DCKT and has a solo show coming up at B15 in Copenhagen. Trudy had a recent blockbuster solo show at Horton Gallery. In a review of her show in the New York Times, Karen Rosenberg noted that “A generation of artists who grew up using a mouse as comfortably as a paintbrush is now coming of age and bringing the giddiness of those formative computer art experiments to good old oil on canvas.” … A perfect conceptual introduction to the Windows exhibition. Studio visits with Russell Tyler and Trudy Benson on Thursday, August 8, 2013

I visited the dynamic husband and wife to select work for an upcoming exhibition at Denny Gallery called “Windows.” Opening on October 24, the exhibition will include work by Trudy Benson, Jeremy Couillard, Mariah Dekkenga, Michael Dotson, Christopher Learey, Jason Stopa and Russell Tyler. 

Russell is currently exhibiting in Acid Summer at DCKT and has a solo show coming up at B15 in Copenhagen. Trudy had a recent blockbuster solo show at Horton Gallery. In a review of her show in the New York Times, Karen Rosenberg noted that “A generation of artists who grew up using a mouse as comfortably as a paintbrush is now coming of age and bringing the giddiness of those formative computer art experiments to good old oil on canvas.” … A perfect conceptual introduction to the Windows exhibition.

Studio visits with Russell Tyler and Trudy Benson on Thursday, August 8, 2013

I visited the dynamic husband and wife to select work for an upcoming exhibition at Denny Gallery called “Windows.” Opening on October 24, the exhibition will include work by Trudy Benson, Jeremy Couillard, Mariah Dekkenga, Michael Dotson, Christopher Learey, Jason Stopa and Russell Tyler.

Russell is currently exhibiting in Acid Summer at DCKT and has a solo show coming up at B15 in Copenhagen. Trudy had a recent blockbuster solo show at Horton Gallery. In a review of her show in the New York Times, Karen Rosenberg noted that “A generation of artists who grew up using a mouse as comfortably as a paintbrush is now coming of age and bringing the giddiness of those formative computer art experiments to good old oil on canvas.” … A perfect conceptual introduction to the Windows exhibition.

Visit with Ryan Frank to the Wassaic Project, CR10 in Hudson, and the Granary, housing the collection of Raymond Learsy and Melva Bucksbaum

1. Carmen Osterlye in “Homeward Found” at the Wassaic Project, used time lapse photography of flowers living and dying and projection mapping to create this installation
2. Rachel Barrett, series of photographs of rural communities. This one focuses on Wassaic.
3. Lisa Fairstein, confetti. Need I say more.
4. Alex McKenzie, a project where the artist drove from Charlotte NC to Wassaic and recorded the radio as it was tuned to only one frequency. Sound piece accompanied by maps and photos.
5. Ryan Frank, our gracious host, outside of CR10, a gallery and performance space founded and directed by Francine Hunter McGivern in Hudson, NY.
6. Overview of upstairs space at CR 10, exhibition “Heavy Equipment”. 
7. Ryan Frank’s works installed at CR10, boxes in the “Handmade Frames” series.
8. Richard Humann “The Same River Twice” 32-foot map of Hudson River filled with tiny pieces of paper of words from books that inspired the artist in his youth living along the river.
9. Susan Wides, “Fresh Kills” (the landfill on Staten Island, presumably.
10. John Cleater, “Thingoscope.” Live feed of the upstairs space (where Evan was) with animation superimposed. Visit with Ryan Frank to the Wassaic Project, CR10 in Hudson, and the Granary, housing the collection of Raymond Learsy and Melva Bucksbaum

1. Carmen Osterlye in “Homeward Found” at the Wassaic Project, used time lapse photography of flowers living and dying and projection mapping to create this installation
2. Rachel Barrett, series of photographs of rural communities. This one focuses on Wassaic.
3. Lisa Fairstein, confetti. Need I say more.
4. Alex McKenzie, a project where the artist drove from Charlotte NC to Wassaic and recorded the radio as it was tuned to only one frequency. Sound piece accompanied by maps and photos.
5. Ryan Frank, our gracious host, outside of CR10, a gallery and performance space founded and directed by Francine Hunter McGivern in Hudson, NY.
6. Overview of upstairs space at CR 10, exhibition “Heavy Equipment”. 
7. Ryan Frank’s works installed at CR10, boxes in the “Handmade Frames” series.
8. Richard Humann “The Same River Twice” 32-foot map of Hudson River filled with tiny pieces of paper of words from books that inspired the artist in his youth living along the river.
9. Susan Wides, “Fresh Kills” (the landfill on Staten Island, presumably.
10. John Cleater, “Thingoscope.” Live feed of the upstairs space (where Evan was) with animation superimposed. Visit with Ryan Frank to the Wassaic Project, CR10 in Hudson, and the Granary, housing the collection of Raymond Learsy and Melva Bucksbaum

1. Carmen Osterlye in “Homeward Found” at the Wassaic Project, used time lapse photography of flowers living and dying and projection mapping to create this installation
2. Rachel Barrett, series of photographs of rural communities. This one focuses on Wassaic.
3. Lisa Fairstein, confetti. Need I say more.
4. Alex McKenzie, a project where the artist drove from Charlotte NC to Wassaic and recorded the radio as it was tuned to only one frequency. Sound piece accompanied by maps and photos.
5. Ryan Frank, our gracious host, outside of CR10, a gallery and performance space founded and directed by Francine Hunter McGivern in Hudson, NY.
6. Overview of upstairs space at CR 10, exhibition “Heavy Equipment”. 
7. Ryan Frank’s works installed at CR10, boxes in the “Handmade Frames” series.
8. Richard Humann “The Same River Twice” 32-foot map of Hudson River filled with tiny pieces of paper of words from books that inspired the artist in his youth living along the river.
9. Susan Wides, “Fresh Kills” (the landfill on Staten Island, presumably.
10. John Cleater, “Thingoscope.” Live feed of the upstairs space (where Evan was) with animation superimposed. Visit with Ryan Frank to the Wassaic Project, CR10 in Hudson, and the Granary, housing the collection of Raymond Learsy and Melva Bucksbaum

1. Carmen Osterlye in “Homeward Found” at the Wassaic Project, used time lapse photography of flowers living and dying and projection mapping to create this installation
2. Rachel Barrett, series of photographs of rural communities. This one focuses on Wassaic.
3. Lisa Fairstein, confetti. Need I say more.
4. Alex McKenzie, a project where the artist drove from Charlotte NC to Wassaic and recorded the radio as it was tuned to only one frequency. Sound piece accompanied by maps and photos.
5. Ryan Frank, our gracious host, outside of CR10, a gallery and performance space founded and directed by Francine Hunter McGivern in Hudson, NY.
6. Overview of upstairs space at CR 10, exhibition “Heavy Equipment”. 
7. Ryan Frank’s works installed at CR10, boxes in the “Handmade Frames” series.
8. Richard Humann “The Same River Twice” 32-foot map of Hudson River filled with tiny pieces of paper of words from books that inspired the artist in his youth living along the river.
9. Susan Wides, “Fresh Kills” (the landfill on Staten Island, presumably.
10. John Cleater, “Thingoscope.” Live feed of the upstairs space (where Evan was) with animation superimposed. Visit with Ryan Frank to the Wassaic Project, CR10 in Hudson, and the Granary, housing the collection of Raymond Learsy and Melva Bucksbaum

1. Carmen Osterlye in “Homeward Found” at the Wassaic Project, used time lapse photography of flowers living and dying and projection mapping to create this installation
2. Rachel Barrett, series of photographs of rural communities. This one focuses on Wassaic.
3. Lisa Fairstein, confetti. Need I say more.
4. Alex McKenzie, a project where the artist drove from Charlotte NC to Wassaic and recorded the radio as it was tuned to only one frequency. Sound piece accompanied by maps and photos.
5. Ryan Frank, our gracious host, outside of CR10, a gallery and performance space founded and directed by Francine Hunter McGivern in Hudson, NY.
6. Overview of upstairs space at CR 10, exhibition “Heavy Equipment”. 
7. Ryan Frank’s works installed at CR10, boxes in the “Handmade Frames” series.
8. Richard Humann “The Same River Twice” 32-foot map of Hudson River filled with tiny pieces of paper of words from books that inspired the artist in his youth living along the river.
9. Susan Wides, “Fresh Kills” (the landfill on Staten Island, presumably.
10. John Cleater, “Thingoscope.” Live feed of the upstairs space (where Evan was) with animation superimposed. Visit with Ryan Frank to the Wassaic Project, CR10 in Hudson, and the Granary, housing the collection of Raymond Learsy and Melva Bucksbaum

1. Carmen Osterlye in “Homeward Found” at the Wassaic Project, used time lapse photography of flowers living and dying and projection mapping to create this installation
2. Rachel Barrett, series of photographs of rural communities. This one focuses on Wassaic.
3. Lisa Fairstein, confetti. Need I say more.
4. Alex McKenzie, a project where the artist drove from Charlotte NC to Wassaic and recorded the radio as it was tuned to only one frequency. Sound piece accompanied by maps and photos.
5. Ryan Frank, our gracious host, outside of CR10, a gallery and performance space founded and directed by Francine Hunter McGivern in Hudson, NY.
6. Overview of upstairs space at CR 10, exhibition “Heavy Equipment”. 
7. Ryan Frank’s works installed at CR10, boxes in the “Handmade Frames” series.
8. Richard Humann “The Same River Twice” 32-foot map of Hudson River filled with tiny pieces of paper of words from books that inspired the artist in his youth living along the river.
9. Susan Wides, “Fresh Kills” (the landfill on Staten Island, presumably.
10. John Cleater, “Thingoscope.” Live feed of the upstairs space (where Evan was) with animation superimposed. Visit with Ryan Frank to the Wassaic Project, CR10 in Hudson, and the Granary, housing the collection of Raymond Learsy and Melva Bucksbaum

1. Carmen Osterlye in “Homeward Found” at the Wassaic Project, used time lapse photography of flowers living and dying and projection mapping to create this installation
2. Rachel Barrett, series of photographs of rural communities. This one focuses on Wassaic.
3. Lisa Fairstein, confetti. Need I say more.
4. Alex McKenzie, a project where the artist drove from Charlotte NC to Wassaic and recorded the radio as it was tuned to only one frequency. Sound piece accompanied by maps and photos.
5. Ryan Frank, our gracious host, outside of CR10, a gallery and performance space founded and directed by Francine Hunter McGivern in Hudson, NY.
6. Overview of upstairs space at CR 10, exhibition “Heavy Equipment”. 
7. Ryan Frank’s works installed at CR10, boxes in the “Handmade Frames” series.
8. Richard Humann “The Same River Twice” 32-foot map of Hudson River filled with tiny pieces of paper of words from books that inspired the artist in his youth living along the river.
9. Susan Wides, “Fresh Kills” (the landfill on Staten Island, presumably.
10. John Cleater, “Thingoscope.” Live feed of the upstairs space (where Evan was) with animation superimposed. Visit with Ryan Frank to the Wassaic Project, CR10 in Hudson, and the Granary, housing the collection of Raymond Learsy and Melva Bucksbaum

1. Carmen Osterlye in “Homeward Found” at the Wassaic Project, used time lapse photography of flowers living and dying and projection mapping to create this installation
2. Rachel Barrett, series of photographs of rural communities. This one focuses on Wassaic.
3. Lisa Fairstein, confetti. Need I say more.
4. Alex McKenzie, a project where the artist drove from Charlotte NC to Wassaic and recorded the radio as it was tuned to only one frequency. Sound piece accompanied by maps and photos.
5. Ryan Frank, our gracious host, outside of CR10, a gallery and performance space founded and directed by Francine Hunter McGivern in Hudson, NY.
6. Overview of upstairs space at CR 10, exhibition “Heavy Equipment”. 
7. Ryan Frank’s works installed at CR10, boxes in the “Handmade Frames” series.
8. Richard Humann “The Same River Twice” 32-foot map of Hudson River filled with tiny pieces of paper of words from books that inspired the artist in his youth living along the river.
9. Susan Wides, “Fresh Kills” (the landfill on Staten Island, presumably.
10. John Cleater, “Thingoscope.” Live feed of the upstairs space (where Evan was) with animation superimposed. Visit with Ryan Frank to the Wassaic Project, CR10 in Hudson, and the Granary, housing the collection of Raymond Learsy and Melva Bucksbaum

1. Carmen Osterlye in “Homeward Found” at the Wassaic Project, used time lapse photography of flowers living and dying and projection mapping to create this installation
2. Rachel Barrett, series of photographs of rural communities. This one focuses on Wassaic.
3. Lisa Fairstein, confetti. Need I say more.
4. Alex McKenzie, a project where the artist drove from Charlotte NC to Wassaic and recorded the radio as it was tuned to only one frequency. Sound piece accompanied by maps and photos.
5. Ryan Frank, our gracious host, outside of CR10, a gallery and performance space founded and directed by Francine Hunter McGivern in Hudson, NY.
6. Overview of upstairs space at CR 10, exhibition “Heavy Equipment”. 
7. Ryan Frank’s works installed at CR10, boxes in the “Handmade Frames” series.
8. Richard Humann “The Same River Twice” 32-foot map of Hudson River filled with tiny pieces of paper of words from books that inspired the artist in his youth living along the river.
9. Susan Wides, “Fresh Kills” (the landfill on Staten Island, presumably.
10. John Cleater, “Thingoscope.” Live feed of the upstairs space (where Evan was) with animation superimposed. Visit with Ryan Frank to the Wassaic Project, CR10 in Hudson, and the Granary, housing the collection of Raymond Learsy and Melva Bucksbaum

1. Carmen Osterlye in “Homeward Found” at the Wassaic Project, used time lapse photography of flowers living and dying and projection mapping to create this installation
2. Rachel Barrett, series of photographs of rural communities. This one focuses on Wassaic.
3. Lisa Fairstein, confetti. Need I say more.
4. Alex McKenzie, a project where the artist drove from Charlotte NC to Wassaic and recorded the radio as it was tuned to only one frequency. Sound piece accompanied by maps and photos.
5. Ryan Frank, our gracious host, outside of CR10, a gallery and performance space founded and directed by Francine Hunter McGivern in Hudson, NY.
6. Overview of upstairs space at CR 10, exhibition “Heavy Equipment”. 
7. Ryan Frank’s works installed at CR10, boxes in the “Handmade Frames” series.
8. Richard Humann “The Same River Twice” 32-foot map of Hudson River filled with tiny pieces of paper of words from books that inspired the artist in his youth living along the river.
9. Susan Wides, “Fresh Kills” (the landfill on Staten Island, presumably.
10. John Cleater, “Thingoscope.” Live feed of the upstairs space (where Evan was) with animation superimposed.

Visit with Ryan Frank to the Wassaic Project, CR10 in Hudson, and the Granary, housing the collection of Raymond Learsy and Melva Bucksbaum

1. Carmen Osterlye in “Homeward Found” at the Wassaic Project, used time lapse photography of flowers living and dying and projection mapping to create this installation
2. Rachel Barrett, series of photographs of rural communities. This one focuses on Wassaic.
3. Lisa Fairstein, confetti. Need I say more.
4. Alex McKenzie, a project where the artist drove from Charlotte NC to Wassaic and recorded the radio as it was tuned to only one frequency. Sound piece accompanied by maps and photos.
5. Ryan Frank, our gracious host, outside of CR10, a gallery and performance space founded and directed by Francine Hunter McGivern in Hudson, NY.
6. Overview of upstairs space at CR 10, exhibition “Heavy Equipment”.
7. Ryan Frank’s works installed at CR10, boxes in the “Handmade Frames” series.
8. Richard Humann “The Same River Twice” 32-foot map of Hudson River filled with tiny pieces of paper of words from books that inspired the artist in his youth living along the river.
9. Susan Wides, “Fresh Kills” (the landfill on Staten Island, presumably.
10. John Cleater, “Thingoscope.” Live feed of the upstairs space (where Evan was) with animation superimposed.

Commissioned sculptural installation by Denny Gallery artist Ole Martin Lund Bø just outside of Oslo. Commissioned sculptural installation by Denny Gallery artist Ole Martin Lund Bø just outside of Oslo. Commissioned sculptural installation by Denny Gallery artist Ole Martin Lund Bø just outside of Oslo.

Commissioned sculptural installation by Denny Gallery artist Ole Martin Lund Bø just outside of Oslo.

Studio visit with Mariah Dekkenga on Friday, August 2, 2013

I visited the studio of Mariah Dekkenga to select work for an upcoming exhibition at Denny Gallery called “Windows”. The exhibition will open on October 24 and include work by Trudy Benson, Jeremy Couillard, Mariah Dekkenga, Michael  Dotson, Christopher Learey, Jason Stopa and Russell Tyler. 

Dekkenga’s beautiful abstractions are initially composed in Adobe Illustrator and also exist as open edition screen savers. After applying a brushy impasto under painting to the canvas, she transfers the composition to the surface, while leaving an edge of canvas, revealing even the image space to be a shape. Recent exhibitions include a solo show at Eli Ping Gallery. Studio visit with Mariah Dekkenga on Friday, August 2, 2013

I visited the studio of Mariah Dekkenga to select work for an upcoming exhibition at Denny Gallery called “Windows”. The exhibition will open on October 24 and include work by Trudy Benson, Jeremy Couillard, Mariah Dekkenga, Michael  Dotson, Christopher Learey, Jason Stopa and Russell Tyler. 

Dekkenga’s beautiful abstractions are initially composed in Adobe Illustrator and also exist as open edition screen savers. After applying a brushy impasto under painting to the canvas, she transfers the composition to the surface, while leaving an edge of canvas, revealing even the image space to be a shape. Recent exhibitions include a solo show at Eli Ping Gallery. Studio visit with Mariah Dekkenga on Friday, August 2, 2013

I visited the studio of Mariah Dekkenga to select work for an upcoming exhibition at Denny Gallery called “Windows”. The exhibition will open on October 24 and include work by Trudy Benson, Jeremy Couillard, Mariah Dekkenga, Michael  Dotson, Christopher Learey, Jason Stopa and Russell Tyler. 

Dekkenga’s beautiful abstractions are initially composed in Adobe Illustrator and also exist as open edition screen savers. After applying a brushy impasto under painting to the canvas, she transfers the composition to the surface, while leaving an edge of canvas, revealing even the image space to be a shape. Recent exhibitions include a solo show at Eli Ping Gallery.

Studio visit with Mariah Dekkenga on Friday, August 2, 2013

I visited the studio of Mariah Dekkenga to select work for an upcoming exhibition at Denny Gallery called “Windows”. The exhibition will open on October 24 and include work by Trudy Benson, Jeremy Couillard, Mariah Dekkenga, Michael Dotson, Christopher Learey, Jason Stopa and Russell Tyler.

Dekkenga’s beautiful abstractions are initially composed in Adobe Illustrator and also exist as open edition screen savers. After applying a brushy impasto under painting to the canvas, she transfers the composition to the surface, while leaving an edge of canvas, revealing even the image space to be a shape. Recent exhibitions include a solo show at Eli Ping Gallery.

Studio Visit with Nat Ward

I visited the studio of the recent Columbia MFA grad Nat Ward yesterday. His thesis project was a 42-photograph masterwork called “He Knew His Days Were Numbers,” exploring fiction and narrative in photography. Recently exhibited in “Jew York” at Untitled.